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Coconut Flour Pumpkin Muffins

Coconut Flour Pumpkin Muffins

I’ve spent many years baking with wheat, rice, spelt, oat and other grain-based flours, and I can tell you it’s tough to make a baked treat that has the right texture and taste without using them.

So, I was particularly excited to adapt a few recipes from Cooking with Coconut Flour to meet our dietary and allergy needs (and to see if they passed the “kid test”).

They did! In fact, these muffins surpassed our expectations greatly, and were fun to make with the help of a four-year old armed with a whisk.

These GAPS/SCD-legal and Paleo-friendly muffins also contain a modicum of nutrition for a treat, owing to the many eggs, nuts and veggies you can include in them.

If you like this recipe, you can easily add it to your weekly meal plan with the Real Plans customizable meal plan and shopping list app!

Coconut Flour Pumpkin Muffins
Yields 6
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Ingredients
  1. 6 pasture-raised eggs, room temperature
  2. 4 Tbsp. coconut oil or butter, melted
  3. 1/2 cup mashed pumpkin or butternut squash
  4. 1 cup honey, maple syrup, Rapadura sugar OR palm sugar (for a low-sugar version, use 1/2 cup sweetener and 40 drops liquid stevia.)
  5. 1 tsp. ground cinnamon
  6. 1/4 tsp. ground mace or pumpkin spice
  7. 1/2 tsp. sea salt
  8. 1 tsp. gluten-free vanilla
  9. 1/2 cup sifted coconut flour (where to find)
  10. 1/2 tsp. baking powder*
Instructions
  1. Blend together the eggs, butter (or oil), pumpkin or squash, sweetener, cinnamon, mace, salt and vanilla.
  2. Combine coconut flour with baking powder and whisk into batter until there are no lumps. Use a stick blender for speed.
  3. Pour batter into greased muffin cups.
  4. Decorate muffin tops with a pecan or shredded coconut, if you wish.
  5. Bake at 400 degrees F for 18 minutes, or until a toothpick or fork comes out clean.
* If you need to substitute for baking powder, 1 tsp. of baking powder equals
  1. 1/4 teaspoon baking soda plus 1/2 teaspoon cream of tartar plus 1/4 teaspoon cornstarch OR
  2. 1/4 teaspoon baking soda plus 1/2 cup buttermilk, sour milk or yogurt to replace 1/2 cup non-acidic liquid in the recipe
Tools
  1. Food processor (for processing pumpkins, I use this one a few times a week. You can put a whole potato in it!)
  2. Stick Blender (For ease of mixing and clean up. I use this one for almost all batters.)
  3. Muffin tins (I like these heart shaped ones made from food-grade silicone)
  4. Flour sifter (I've used this one-handed sifter for years)
Adapted from Cooking with Coconut Flour
Small Footprint Family http://www.smallfootprintfamily.com/
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20 Comments

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  • You guys know that pasture raised eggs are not sustainable…

    Don’t get me wrong, I am not in favor of factory farms, but the math for the amount of eggs consumed annually x space to raise those eggs means pasture raised translates into cutting down forests to convert to farmland. Until we can learn to stop using so many eggs (i.e. more vegans) advocating against big farm policies that increase egg production may actually do more harm than good.

    Thought I should point that out since the point of this site seems to be about sustainability. I am gonna go with a recipe that doesn’t call for so many eggs instead.

    • You’re assuming that a farm would ONLY produce eggs. Monocultures are part of the industrial model. In contrast, chickens fit in very well into a mixed-use, permaculture-based farm that rotates pasture with crops, or encompasses holistic grazing of cows and other ruminants on the same pasture. This is usually how it is done. No clear-cutting needed.

      Raising chickens in the backyard or on smallholdings (which is becoming very popular) also provides a source of healthy, humane, outdoor-raised eggs. It wasn’t that long ago that all eggs were produced in this way. Industrially produced eggs are the newcomers. 🙂

      Also, as a side note, you’ll find that virtually all coconut flour recipes call for a ton of eggs. It’s the nature of coconut flour to need a lot of them to produce quality baked treats. If you prefer to use fewer eggs, definitely avoid coconut flour recipes!

  • What a great recipe! This is the first grain-free recipe my kids have whole-heartedly enjoyed. Thanks so much!! These are going on my weekly meal plan for breakfast.

  • I made these this morning & they’re good! I was hesitant on the recipe seeing as there’s only 1/2 cup coconut flour to all that liquid so I added just a pinch more…About 15 minutes in the tips of the muffins began to burn (is it because there are lots of eggs?) so I just tented foil over my pan & baked for 5 more minutes & they turned out perfect. Glad I found this recipe, it’s a keeper.

    • I’m so glad you enjoyed them! Coconut flour is an odd flour and just doesn’t “work” the way other flours do, and needs tons of eggs to bind. I’m glad you were able to keep them from burning!

  • I am so excited about these- however I’m struggling to cook them through. They come out burned on the outside and raw on inside. What am I doing wrong? Thank you!

    • Wow! That is odd. I’d say your oven is running hot or you’re using a muffin tin that transmits heat unevenly. Try turning the temps down a bit and cooking a little longer.

    • You really can’t really bake with coconut flour without eggs. Egg substitutes like flax goo just don’t work with coconut flour. However, my recipe section is 100% grain free, and much of it is raw and/or vegan. The raw/fermented section is definitely egg free.

  • These look very good and so moist! Thanks for linking up at our Gluten Free Fridays party! What a fantastic link up of recipes and other GF goodies! Each week, I am so amazed! I have tweeted and pinned your entry to our Gluten Free Fridays board on Pinterest! 🙂 I hope that you’ll join us this week! Cindy from vegetarianmamma.com

  • Hi Dawn,
    These are great muffins! Thank you so much for sharing your awesome recipe with Full Plate Thursday. Hope you have a great weekend and come back soon!
    Miz Helen

  • The muffins sound delicious. Where do you get coconut flour? I often use arrowroot flour (or powder) as a thickener. I wonder if arrowroot could be used instead of the coconut flour.

    • You can find coconut flour online here. You cannot sub arrowroot flour in this recipe. Coconut flour has unique properties that make it very different from other flours, and this recipe was made to work with those properties.

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